Content Indices

Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Content Index

GENERAL STANDARD DISCLOSURES

GRI IndicatorDescriptionLocation
Organizational Profile
102-1Name of the organizationEQT Corporation
102-2Activities, brands, products, and servicesCorporate Profile
Hydraulic fracturing is prohibited in some regions of the United States; however, we do not have active operations in these areas. Additionally, there are no bans on any of our primary brands, products or services.
102-3Location of headquartersPittsburgh, Pennsylvania
102-4Location of operationsCorporate Profile
102-5Ownership and legal formCorporate Profile
102-6Markets servedCorporate Profile
102-7Scale of the organizationCorporate Profile
102-8Information on employees and other workersEmployee Information (as of 12/31/21)
 
Employees: 693
  • Female: 175
  • Male: 518
  • Ohio: 9
  • Pennsylvania: 547
  • Texas: 21
  • Other States: 15
Full-time Employees: 686
  • Female: 172
  • Male: 514
  • Ohio: 9
  • Pennsylvania: 540
  • Texas: 21
  • West Virginia: 101
  • Other States: 15
Part-time Employees: 7
  • Female: 3
  • Male: 4
  • Pennsylvania: 7
Temporary Employees: 198
 
102-9Supply chainCorporate Profile
102-10Significant changes to the organization and its supply chainCorporate Profile
2021 Form 10-K, p. 8-9
102-11Precautionary Principle or approachAlthough we do not formally follow the precautionary principle, we assess environmental risks across our operations.
102-12External initiativesPublic Policy and Perception — Corporate Memberships
102-13Membership of associationsPublic Policy and Perception — Corporate Memberships
Strategy
102-14Statement from senior decision-makerLetter from Our Chief Executive Officer
Ethics and Integrity
102-16Values, principles, standards and norms of behaviorEthics and Integrity
We operate exclusively within the United States, and predominately within three states — Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio. All of our employees speak English and English is the primary language spoken by the population where we operate. Accordingly, our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics is only made available in English.
102-17Mechanisms for advice and concerns about ethicsEthics and Integrity
Governance
102-18Governance structureCorporate Governance
102-19Delegating authorityCorporate Governance
102-20Executive-level responsibility for economic, environmental and social topicsCorporate Governance
102-21Consulting stakeholders on economic, environmental, and social topicsCorporate Governance
102-22Composition of the highest governance body and its committeesCorporate Governance
102-23Chair of the highest governance bodyCorporate Governance
102-24Nominating and selecting the highest governance bodyThe Corporate Governance Committee of the Board of Directors identifies and recommends to the Board requisite skills and characteristics for individuals qualified to serve as directors. The Corporate Governance Committee identifies potential director candidates through many sources, including third-party search firms and unsolicited shareholder submissions. All of our directors annually stand for election by shareholders. For additional information on Board member qualifications, please see the Board of Directors page on our website. For more information on our director nomination and selection process, see pages 12–18 of our 2022 Proxy Statement.
102-25Conflicts of interestWe disclose conflicts of interest to stakeholders as required by law. Our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics outlines our policy to avoid conflicts of interest (we also have an internal Conflicts of Interest Policy). We maintain a majority of independent directors and our Corporate Governance Committee monitors related-person transactions. For more information, see pages 29–33 of our 2022 Proxy Statement.
102-26Roles of highest governance body in setting purpose, values and strategyCorporate Governance
102-27Collective knowledge of highest governance bodyUpon election, our directors participate in an initial orientation to Board service and routinely receive information from management to inform them about company business — including related economic, environmental, and social topics. We encourage our directors to participate in outside educational programs for which we fund or reimburse our directors’ participation.
102-28Evaluating the highest governance body's performanceThe Board and its Committees use performance assessments to evaluate how well they are fulfilling their governance responsibilities. The Board and its Committees conduct annual self-assessments and each director — in a discussion with the Chair of the Board — provides feedback on individual director performance. Although the Board does not publicly disclose any actions taken in response to its annual self-assessments, it takes the assessment process seriously and responds appropriately to the results to improve overall governance performance.
102-29Identifying and managing economic, environmental and social impactsCorporate Governance
102-30Effectiveness of risk management processes

The Board oversees and evaluates the process for assessing the major risks facing EQT and the related risk mitigation options. These responsibilities include:

  • Performing an annual review of our major risks;
  • Addressing major risks with management via presentations throughout the year (initiated by management or requested by the Board); and
  • Delegating oversight for certain risks to Committees of the Board

Additionally, the Audit Committee of the Board reviews our major risk exposures and key processes implemented to monitor and control such exposures. When making decisions on behalf of EQT, the Board considers the feedback provided by its respective stakeholders.

102-31Review of economic, environmental and social topicsCorporate Governance
102-32Highest governance body's role in sustainability reportingCorporate Governance
102-33Communicating critical concerns

To achieve sustainable performance for shareholders, employees, landowners, customers, and communities, the Board is committed to overseeing EQT with integrity, accountability, and transparency. The Board welcomes input on how it is doing and provides stakeholders with multiple ways to communicate with our governing body.

The Chair of the Board is a key point of contact on the Board for concerns or inquiries. Avenues for contacting the Chair or other members of the Board include:

  • Communicating directly with the Board (and with independent directors, individually or as a group) by sending an email to independentchair@eqt.com. Traditional written correspondence, directed to our Corporate Secretary, sent to the following address:

    EQT Corporation
    c/o Corporate Secretary
    625 Liberty Avenue
    Suite 1700
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
  • Communications sent to our Corporate Secretary are reviewed by the Corporate Secretary, or an appropriate individual on their staff, and such communications are promptly delivered to the appropriate director or directors unless the communications are junk mail or mass mailings.

  • Communications may be made anonymously or confidentially.

102-34Nature and total number of critical concerns

While we do not maintain a record of concerns communicated to the Board, we have conducted a formal shareholder engagement program since 2010 and we maintain active dialogue with our shareholders year-round. Through our investor relations program, senior executives hold meetings with our investors or potential investors to discuss operations, strategy, and other critical items as outlined on page 7 of our 2022 Proxy Statement. During 2021, our team had over 750 interactions with our shareholders, including meetings with over 200 individual firms covering 45% of our shareholder base. Our Chief Executive Officer or Chief Financial Officer participated in over half of these interactions with shareholders during 2021. Our management team uses our annual ESG Report to help guide conversations with investors regarding economic, environmental, and social topics. When investors pose specific questions, our management team schedules calls and/or meetings to address their inquiries accordingly.

As described in Stakeholder Engagement and Materiality, the Board values and regularly considers the input and feedback of all stakeholders in its oversight of our sustainability efforts.

102-35Remuneration policies

Our independent director compensation — including descriptions of cash, equity-based, and other compensation — and related processes are outlined on pages 34–37 of our 2022 Proxy Statement.

We also have compensation recoupment, or a “clawback” policy, applicable to current and former executive officers if we are required to prepare an accounting restatement due to material noncompliance with any financial reporting mandate under U.S. securities laws. The policy authorizes us to recoup certain compensation from covered executives who received equity or non-equity incentive compensation.

102-36Process for determining remuneration

Annually, the Corporate Governance Committee reviews, and the entire Board approves, the compensation of our executive officers.

The Management Development and Compensation Committee of the Board establishes the target total direct compensation for executive officers by establishing base salaries, setting long-term and annual incentive targets, and approving perquisites. The Management Development and Compensation Committee approves annual and long-term incentive programs on a yearly basis with recommendations from management and an independent compensation consultant. For more information regarding our executive compensation process, see pages 49–50 of our 2022 Proxy Statement; additionally, pages 51–76 describe our executive compensation program and performance.

102-37Stakeholders' involvement in remunerationThe Management Development and Compensation Committee considers investor feedback during the design of our long-term incentive programs. At our 2022 annual meeting of shareholders, 98.8% of votes cast approved the “Say-on-Pay” proposal, approving the compensation of our named executive officers.
102-38Annual total compensation ratioSee page 76 of our 2022 Proxy Statement.
102-39Percentage increase in annual total compensation ratioOur Chief Executive Officer’s annual total compensation ratio increased from 65:1 in 2020 to 138:1 in 2021. Our Chief Executive Officer’s total annual compensation increased from $7,526,515 in 2020 to $16,919,763 in 2021, as calculated pursuant to Securities and Exchange Commission rules.
Stakeholder Engagement
102-40List of stakeholder groupsStakeholder Engagement
and Materiality
102-41Collective bargaining agreementsNone of our employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements.
102-42Identifying and selecting stakeholdersStakeholder Engagement
and Materiality
102-43Approach to stakeholder engagementStakeholder Engagement
and Materiality
102-44Key topics and concerns raisedStakeholder Engagement
and Materiality
Reporting Practices
102-45Entities included in the consolidated financial statementsCorporate Profile
102-46Defining report content and topic BoundariesStakeholder Engagement
and Materiality
102-47List of material topicsStakeholder Engagement
and Materiality
102-48Restatements of informationIn the fourth quarter of 2020, we acquired upstream assets and an investment in midstream gathering assets located in the Appalachian Basin (collectively, the Chevron Assets) from Chevron U.S.A. Inc. (the Chevron Acquisition). The Chevron Acquisition closed on November 30, 2020 and had an effective date of July 1, 2020. Given the end of year closing of the Chevron Acquisition, in our Calendar Year 2020 ESG Report we disclosed certain 2020 production and emissions data related to the Chevron Assets separate from our data. In this year’s report, we restated our 2020 production and emissions data and intensities to include the 2020 production and emissions values from the Chevron Assets with our data. Accordingly, all of our data disclosed in our 2021 ESG Report includes data from the acquired Chevron Assets.
102-49Changes in reportingNo changes in reporting.
102-50Reporting periodJanuary 1, 2021 through December 31, 2021
102-51Date of most recent reportJune 29, 2021
102-52Reporting cycleAnnual
102-53Contact point for questions regarding the reportCameron Horwitz, Managing Director, Investor Relations and Strategy (412-395-2555; Cameron.Horwitz@eqt.com)
102-54Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI StandardsThis report has been prepared in accordance with the GRI Standards: Core option.
102-55GRI content indexThis page
102-56External assuranceWe conducted a self-assessment of the report; however, we did not submit the report for external assurance.

SPECIFIC STANDARD DISCLOSURES

GRI StandardDisclosureDescriptionLocation or Direct AnswerOmission
GRI 200 Economic Standard Series
Indirect Economic Impacts
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryCommunity Impacts
and Safety
103-2The management approach and its componentsCommunity Impacts
and Safety
103-3Evaluation of the management approachCommunity Impacts
and Safety
GRI 203: Indirect Economic Impacts 2016
203-1Infrastructure investments and services supportedCommunity Impacts
and Safety
203-2Significant indirect economic impactsCommunity Impacts
and Safety
Procurement Practices
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-2The management approach and its componentsTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-3Evaluation of the management approachTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
GRI 204: Procurement Practices 2016
204-1Proportion of spending on local suppliers
 
Community Impacts
and Safety
Anti-Corruption
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryEthics and Integrity
103-2The management approach and its componentsEthics and Integrity
103-3Evaluation of the management approachEthics and Integrity
GRI 205: Anti-Corruption 2016
205-2Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and proceduresEthics and Integrity
GRI 300 Environmental Standards Series
Energy
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryNot material
103-2The management approach and its componentsNot material
103-3Evaluation of the management approachNot material
GRI 302: Energy 2016
302-1Energy consumption within the organizationSee the Data Download for a breakdown of our energy consumption. An insignificant amount of our energy consumption is derived from solar panels on our well pads; otherwise, all of the energy we consume is from non-renewable sources.
Water
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryWater
103-2The management approach and its componentsWater
103-3Evaluation of the management approachWater
GRI 303: Water and Effluents 2018
303-1Interactions with water as a shared resourceWater
303-2Management of water discharge-related impactsWater
303-3Water withdrawalWaterInformation unavailable for 303-3: We do not track rainwater usage and we do not have any plans to begin tracking rainwater usage.
303-4Water dischargeWater
303-5Water consumption Water
We do not have reservoirs. Our Aboveground Storage Tanks hold impaired water and are temporary structures. Our freshwater impoundments collect rainwater, but are only used to store water when we need it for a current operation, and rainwater has a minimal effect on our total water usage.
Biodiversity
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
103-2The management approach and its componentsBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
103-3Evaluation of the management approachBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
GRI 304: Biodiversity 2016
304-1Operational sites owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areasBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
304-2Significant impacts of activities, products and services on biodiversityBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
304-3Habitats protected or restoredBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
304-4IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operationsBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
Emissions
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryClimate and
GHG Emissions

Air Quality
103-2The management approach and its componentsClimate and
GHG Emissions

Air Quality
103-3Evaluation of the management approachClimate and
GHG Emissions

Air Quality
GRI 305: Emissions 2016
305-1Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissionsClimate and
GHG Emissions

Data Download
305-2Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissionsClimate and
GHG Emissions

Data Download
305-3Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissionsClimate and
GHG Emissions

Data Download
305-4GHG emissions intensityClimate and
GHG Emissions

Data Download
305-5Reduction of GHG emissionsClimate and
GHG Emissions
305-7Nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and other significant air emissionsAir QualityInformation unavailable for 305-7: We do not currently track Persistent Organic Pollutants and we do not have any plans to begin tracking Persistent Organic Pollutants.
Effluents & Waste
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundarySpills
103-2The management approach and its componentsSpills
103-3Evaluation of the management approachSpills
GRI 306: Effluents and Waste 2016
306-2Waste by type and disposal methodData Download
306-3Significant spillsSpills
306-4Transport of hazardous wasteWe did not create or transport hazardous waste in 2021.
Environmental Compliance
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
103-2The management approach and its componentsBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
103-3Evaluation of the management approachBiodiversity and
Land Impacts
GRI 307: Environmental Compliance 2016
307-1Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations
  • Total number of 2021 environmental non-monetary sanctions: 0
  • Total number of 2021 significant environmental fines: 1
  • Total monetary value of 2021 significant environmental fines: $549,575
  • Cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms: 5
*For purposes of this disclosure, we define “significant fine” as a monetary fine equal to or exceeding $300,000.
GRI 400 Social Standards Series
Employment
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-2The management approach and its componentsTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-3Evaluation of the management approachTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
GRI 401: Employment 2016
401-1New employee hires and employee turnoverTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
401-2Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employeesTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
401-3Parental leaveTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
Occupational Health and Safety
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryOccupational Health
and Safety
103-2The management approach and its componentsOccupational Health
and Safety
103-3Evaluation of the management approachOccupational Health
and Safety
GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety 2018
403-1Occupational health and safety management systemOccupational Health
and Safety
403-2Hazard identification, risk assessment and incident investigationOccupational Health
and Safety
403-3Occupational health servicesOccupational Health
and Safety
403-4Worker participation, consultation and communication on occupational health and safetyOccupational Health
and Safety
403-5Worker training on occupational health and safetyOccupational Health
and Safety
403-6Promotion of worker healthTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
403-7Prevention and mitigation of occupational health and safety impacts directly linked by business relationshipsOccupational Health
and Safety
403-8Workers covered by an occupational health and safety management systemOccupational Health
and Safety
403-9Work-related injuriesOccupational Health
and Safety
We are unable to include high-consequence work-related injuries for contractors as we do not currently track contractor recovery times for injuries.
403-10Work-related ill healthOccupational Health
and Safety
Training and Education
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-2The management approach and its componentsTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-3Evaluation of the management approachTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
GRI 404: Training and Education 2016
404-2Programs for upgrading employee skills and transition assistance programsTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
404-3Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviewsTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
Diversity and Equal Opportunity
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-2The management approach and its componentsTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
103-3Evaluation of the management approachTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
GRI 405: Diversity and Equal Opportunity 2016
405-1Diversity of governance bodies and employeesTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
Corporate Governance
405-2Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to menTalent Attraction and Retention, Diversity and Inclusion
Local Communities
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryCommunity Impacts
and Safety
103-2The management approach and its componentsCommunity Impacts
and Safety
103-3Evaluation of the management approachCommunity Impacts
and Safety
GRI 413: Local Communities 2016
413-1Operations with local community engagement, impacts assessments and development programsCommunity Impacts
and Safety
While we do not track the specific percentage of our operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs, we work in coordination with all of the communities where we operate to help mitigate any impacts from our operations on the community. We also maintain an Owner Relations hotline and online submission form, enabling all community members in the areas where we operate to contact us regarding any complaints or concerns they may have with respect to our operations. Please see Community Impacts and Safety for more details.
413-2Operations with significant actual and potential negative impacts on local communitiesCommunity Impacts
and Safety
Public Policy
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryPublic Policy
and Perception
103-2The management approach and its componentsPublic Policy
and Perception
103-3Evaluation of the management approachPublic Policy
and Perception
GRI 415: Public Policy 2016
415-1Political contributionsPublic Policy
and Perception
Socio Economic Compliance
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryCommunity Impacts
and Safety
103-2The management approach and its componentsCommunity Impacts
and Safety
103-3Evaluation of the management approachCommunity Impacts
and Safety
GRI 419: Socioeconomic Compliance 2016
419-1Non-compliance with laws and regulations in the social and economic areaExcept as set forth in GRI 307-1 (Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations), we were not subject to any significant fines or non-monetary sanctions in 2021.

*For purposes of this disclosure, we define “significant fine” as a monetary fine equal to or exceeding $300,000.
Custom Topic: Landowner Relations
GRI 103: Management Approach 2016
103-1Explanation of the material topic and its BoundaryLandowner Relations
103-2The management approach and its componentsLandowner Relations
103-3Evaluation of the management approachLandowner Relations
CustomNumber of calls and emails received from landownersLandowner Relations

Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) Index

SUSTAINABILITY DISCLOSURE TOPICS AND ACCOUNTING METRICS — OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
 

TopicAccounting MetricResponse/Location
Greenhouse Gas Emissions SASB EM-EP-110a.1: Gross global Scope 1 emissions, percentage methane, percentage covered under emissions-limiting regulationsClimate and GHG Emissions — GHG Emissions and Targets
SASB EM-EP-110a.2: Amount of gross global Scope 1 emissions from: (1) flared hydrocarbons, (2) other combustion, (3) process emissions, (4) other vented emissions, and (5) fugitive emissionsClimate and GHG Emissions — GHG Emissions and Targets
SASB EM-EP-110a.3: Discussion of long-term and short-term strategy or plan to manage Scope 1 emissions, emissions reduction targets, and an analysis of performance against those targetsClimate and GHG Emissions — Strategy and Vision; GHG Emissions and Targets
Air Quality SASB EM-EP-120a.1: Air emissions of the following pollutants: (1) NOx (excluding N2O), (2) SOx, (3) volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and (4) particulate matter (PM10)Air Quality — Inspections and Benchmarking
Water Management SASB EM-EP-140a.1: (1) Total fresh water withdrawn, (2) total fresh water consumed, percentage of each in regions with High or Extremely High Baseline Water StressWater — How We Are Doing
SASB EM-EP-140a.2: Volume of produced water and flowback generated; percentage (1) discharged, (2) injected, (3) recycled; hydrocarbon content in discharged waterWater — How We Are Doing
SASB EM-EP-140a.3: Percentage of hydraulically fractured wells for which there is public disclosure of all fracturing fluid chemicals used100%; see Water — Hydraulic Fracturing for more information
SASB EM-EP-140a.4: Percentage of hydraulic fracturing sites where ground or surface water quality deteriorated compared to a baselineWater — How We Are Doing
Biodiversity Impacts SASB EM-EP-160a.1: Description of environmental management policies and practices for active sitesBiodiversity and Land Impacts — Ongoing Monitoring of Active Sites
SASB EM-EP-160a.2: Number and aggregate volume of hydrocarbon spills, volume in Arctic, volume impacting shorelines with ESI rankings 8-10, and volume recoveredSpills — How We Are Doing
SASB EM-EP-160a.3: Percentage of (1) proved and (2) probable reserves in or near sites with protected conservation status or endangered species habitatBiodiversity and Land Impacts — How We Are Doing
Security, Human Rights and Rights of Indigenous Peoples SASB EM-EP-210a.1: Percentage of (1) proved and (2) probable reserves in or near areas of conflict We do not have any reserves in or near areas of conflict.
SASB EM-EP-210a.2: Percentage of (1) proved and (2) probable reserves in or near indigenous landTo our knowledge, we do not have any reserves in or near Indigenous land. Additionally, in 2021, we obtained independent certification that a majority of our natural gas is produced in accordance with rigorous standards for responsible development maintained by Equitable Origin, known as the EO100™ Standard for Responsible Energy Development. The EO100™ Standard encompasses five principles: corporate governance and ethics; social impacts, human rights, and community engagement; Indigenous Peoples' rights; occupational health and safety and fair labor standards; and environmental impacts, biodiversity, and climate change. Based on a review of our operations and reserves, Equitable Origin determined that the Indigenous Peoples' rights principle was not applicable to us.
SASB EM-EP-210a.3: Discussion of engagement processes and due diligence practices with respect to human rights, indigenous rights, and operation in areas of conflictWe do not operate in areas of conflict.
Community Relations SASB EM-EP-210b.1: Discussion of process to manage risks and opportunities associated with community rights and interestsCommunity Impacts and Safety — Working with Communities
SASB EM-EP-210b.2: Number and duration of non-technical delaysOur operations are subject to numerous regulatory and permitting requirements. We strive to account for potential delays in obtaining regulatory and permitting approvals or similar non-technical factors in our scheduling process. In 2021, none of our operations were stopped or delayed due to unanticipated non-technical factors.
Workforce Health and Safety SASB EM-EP-320a.1: (1) Total recordable incident rate (TRIR), (2) fatality rate, (3) near miss frequency rate (NMFR), and (4) average hours of health, safety, and emergency response training for (a) full-time employees, (b) contract employees, and (c) short-service employeesOccupational Health and Safety — How We Are Doing
SASB EM-EP-320a.2: Discussion of management systems used to integrate a culture of safety throughout the exploration and production lifecycleOccupational Health and Safety — What We Are Doing
Reserves Valuation & Capital Expenditures SASB EM-EP-420a.1: Sensitivity of hydrocarbon reserve levels to future price projection scenarios that account for a price on carbon emissionsClimate and GHG Emissions — Vision for EQT in the Energy Transition; Risk Management
SASB EM-EP-420a.2: Estimated carbon dioxide emissions embedded in proved hydrocarbon reservesWe estimate that we had 346,748 metric tons of CO2 embedded in our proved hydrocarbon reserves in 2021.
SASB EM-EP-420a.3: Amount invested in renewable energy, revenue generated by renewable energy salesAt certain sites, we either use solar technology to generate power or capture natural gas from the field to power fuel cells, generating on-site energy. We do not track the amount of energy produced by these means as it is only used in remote locations and on a limited basis.
SASB EM-EP-420a.4: Discussion of how price and demand for hydrocarbons and/or climate regulation influence the capital expenditure strategy for exploration, acquisition, and development of assetsClimate and GHG Emissions — Sustainable Value Creation;
Accelerating the Low Carbon Transition;
EQT’s Response Letter to Senator Elizabeth Warren
Business Ethics and Transparency SASB EM-EP-510a.1: Percentage of (1) proved and (2) probable reserves in countries that have the 20 lowest rankings in Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index0% — EQT only operates in the United States; therefore, we have no reserves in these countries.
SASB EM-EP-510a.2: Description of the management system for prevention of corruption and bribery throughout the value chainEthics and Integrity — What We Are Doing
Management of the Legal & Regulatory Environment SASB EM-EP-530a.1: Discussion of corporate positions related to government regulations and/or policy proposals that address environmental and social factors affecting the industryPublic Policy and Perception — Public Policy Issues and Engagement
Critical Incident Risk Management SASB EM-EP-540a.2: Description of management systems used to identify and mitigate catastrophic and tail-end risksCommunity Impacts and Safety — Emergency Planning

ACTIVITY METRICS
 

Activity MetricResponse/Location
SASB EM-EP-000.A: Production of: (1) oil, (2) natural gas, (3) synthetic oil, and (4) synthetic gasCorporate Profile — Reserves and Production;
we did not produce any synthetic natural gas or synthetic oil in 2021.
SASB EM-EP-000.B: Number of offshore sitesWe do not operate any offshore sites.
SASB EM-EP-000.C: Number of terrestrial sites As of December 31, 2021, we operated 616 well pads.

Disclosing the Facts Index

Indicator

Response/Location

1) Well Evaluation

Water — Monitoring Impacts

2) Well Integrity

In December 2021, we discovered a produced water leak associated with a Gas Processing Unit disposal line at one of our well pad sites located in Washington County, Pennsylvania. We self-reported the release to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) spill hotline on December 4, 2021 and initiated cleanup of the released produced water. The initial release was determined to be in excess of one barrel and we entered the remediation project into PADEP's Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Act 2 Program (Act 2) for voluntary clean up. In January 2022, we determined the release was larger than initially discovered and we disclosed this information to PADEP on January 14, 2022. Site characterization of the release is ongoing and, upon completion, we intend to initiate the remediation according to PADEP's Act 2 guidelines.
Water — Monitoring Impacts; Spills — How We are Doing

3) Near Misses

Occupational Health and Safety — How We Are Doing

4) Offset Well Assessment

Water — Hydraulic Fracturing; Monitoring Impacts

5) Avoiding Induced Seismic Activity

We operate in the Appalachian Basin — primarily in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio. Our operating areas have historically not experienced significant seismic activity associated with natural gas drilling operations. Most seismic activity associated with natural gas drilling operations is related to the injection of produced wastewater into the ground. In 2021, we recycled 82% of our produced water, reducing the amount of wastewater that would have otherwise been injected into the ground. Furthermore, we have reciprocal arrangements with other producers in Appalachia to reuse each other’s wastewater in hydraulic fracturing operations. In 2021, we recycled nearly 3 million barrels of our wastewater through use in other operators’ fracturing locations. In turn, we received 300,000 barrels of water produced by other operators for use in our operations. These water sharing arrangements throughout the Appalachian Basin, and an overall emphasis on recycling wastewater, have helped reduced the amount of wastewater that is injected within the Appalachian Basin, which we believe has also reduced the amount and magnitude of seismic activity in our operating areas.
Water — Wastewater Management

6) Pre-drill H2O Monitoring

Water — Monitoring Impacts

7) Post-drill H2O Monitoring

Water — Monitoring Impacts

8) Evaluating Water Scarcity

Water — Water Withdrawals

9) Total Water Use

Water — How We Are Doing

10) Freshwater and Non-freshwater Use

Water — How We Are Doing

11) Water Source Types

Water — How We Are Doing

12) Wastewater Use

Water — How We Are Doing

13) Reducing Fresh water

As much as possible, we seek to use our own or third-party produced water for our operations to minimize freshwater withdrawals. In 2021, 28% of the total water that we consumed came from non-freshwater sources — including our produced water or third-party impaired water.
Water — Water Withdrawals; How We Are Doing

14) Wastewater Volume

Water — Wastewater Management; How We Are Doing

15) Wastewater Storage Methods

Water — Monitoring Impacts; Wastewater Management

16) Wastewater Storage Safeguards

Water — Monitoring Impacts; Wastewater Management

17) Drilling Residuals

Our drill mud and cuttings are processed using solids control equipment that efficiently separate drilling fluids from solids. Drying agents then remove any residual moisture and the dried cuttings are stored in containers and transported by truck to landfills that are pre-approved to accept these solids in their permitted disposal cells. We continue to improve the efficiency of our solids management program by using higher efficiency systems that create better separation of drilling fluid and drill cuttings, reducing the overall weight of the disposed product. Using more effective drying agents decreases the amount of agents needed, which also decreases the weight of the disposed product.

18) NORM

We actively review whether new processes will generate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM).

19) Managing Inactive Wells

Biodiversity and Land Impacts — Decommissioning and Inactive Sites

20) Use of Waste Products

Water — Wastewater Management.
We continuously evaluate minimization and beneficial reuse options for our waste products from both an environmental and economic standpoint. Currently, reuse of our wastewater is only used for hydraulic fracturing operations.
Water — Monitoring Impacts; Wastewater Management

21) Toxicity Reduction

Water — Hydraulic Fracturing

22) Dry Chemical Use

We currently do not use any dry hydraulic fracturing chemicals in our operations.

23) Eliminating BTEX

We do not use any toluene, ethylbenzene, or xylene chemicals in our hydraulic fracturing fluids. In connection with a routine assessment of the components of the drilling fluids used in our operations, we discovered that one of the lubricants utilized in certain of our completions operations contains benzene (benzenesulfonic acid). The lubricant containing this chemical was used sparingly in our completions operations during 2021, and we are conducting analysis to determine the specific amount which was used and amending our FracFocus reports to disclose the use of this chemical. We are also evaluating alternative lubricants which do not contain benzene which can be used to remove this chemical from our operations.

24) CBI Disclaimer

We publicly disclose, via FracFocus.org, the chemicals used in our hydraulically fractured wells and regularly update such disclosures. As of December 31, 2021, we did not directly claim any confidential business information (CBI) restrictions with respect to disclosing chemicals used in our hydraulically fractured wells; however, some of our chemical vendors and suppliers refuse to publicly detail the composition of their proprietary additives, citing CBI protections, and, therefore, the chemical makeup of our hydraulic fracturing fluid as reported on FracFocus may not be complete due to such third-party CBI restrictions. In the case that one or more chemicals in our hydraulic fracturing fluid cannot be publicly disclosed on FracFocus due to third-party CBI restrictions, the entry is marked as “Proprietary” in lieu of listing the chemical additive name or number. However, even if a chemical is marked as “Proprietary,” the supplier of the chemical and the chemical’s purpose and ingredient concentration is listed in the FracFocus report.
Water — Hydraulic Fracturing

25) Reducing CBI Claims

As noted above, some of the vendors and suppliers who supply chemicals used in our hydraulic fracturing fluid refuse to publicly detail the composition of their proprietary additives, citing CBI protections. Where possible, we work with our vendors to develop self-sourced fracturing chemicals in an effort to minimize our environmental impact and reduce the use of unknown chemicals that cannot be disclosed because of their protection as CBI. We also work with our vendors to ensure that data from our well completions is accurately and timely submitted to FracFocus.org.
Water — Hydraulic Fracturing

American Exploration and Production Council (AXPC) Index

Topic

Metric

EQT

Alta Assets

Production of Hydrocarbons

Gross Annual Production of Oil/Condensate (Bbl)

3,542,479

0

Gross Annual Production of Natural Gas (Mcf)

1,942,499,269

222,384,467

Total Gross Annual Production (BOE)

327,292,357

37,064,078

Total Gross Annual Production (MBOE)

327,292

37,064

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Scope 1 GHG Emissions (MT CO2e)

639,676

357,907

Scope 1 GHG Intensity (#)
(Scope 1 GHG Emissions [MT CO2e] / Total Gross Annual Production [MBOE])

1.95

9.66

Percent of Scope 1 GHG Emissions Attributed to Gathering and Boosting Segment

8.7%

40.1%

Scope 2 GHG Emissions (MT CO2e)

4,619

680

Scopes 1 and 2 Combined GHG Intensity (#)
(Scope 1 GHG Emissions [MT CO2e] + Scope 2 GHG Emissions [MT CO2e]) / Total Gross Annual Production [MBOE])

1.97

9.67

Scope 1 Methane Emissions (MT CH4)

15,002

5,641

Scope 1 Methane Intensity (#)
(Scope 1 Methane Emissions [MT CH4] / Total Gross Annual Production [MBOE])

0.05

0.15

Percent of Scope 1 Methane Emissions Attributed to Gathering and Boosting Segment

3.7%

38.0%

Flaring

Gross Annual Volume of Flared Gas (Mcf)

0

0

Percentage of Gas Flared per Mcf of Gas Produced
(Gross Annual Volume of Flared Gas [Mcf] / Gross Annual Production of Natural Gas [Mcf])

0%

0%

Volume of Gas Flared per Barrel of Oil Equivalent produced
(Gross Annual Volume of Flared Gas [Mcf] / Total Gross Annual Production [BOE])

0

0

Spills

Produced Liquid Spilled (Bbl)

22,666

30

Total Produced Liquid (MBbl)

24,454

1,915

Spill Intensity (%)
(Produced Liquid Spilled [Bbl] / Total Produced Liquid [MBbl])

92.7%

1.6%

Water Use

Freshwater Consumed (Bbl)

39,647,886

N/A

Freshwater Intensity (#)
(Freshwater Consumed [Bbl] / Gross Annual Production [BOE])

0.12

N/A

Recycled Water (Bbl)

20,561,615

N/A

Total Water Consumed (Bbl)

60,209,501

N/A

Water Recycle Rate (%)
(Recycled Water [Bbl] / Total Water Consumed [Bbl])

34.2%

N/A

Does your company use WRI Aqueduct, GEMI, Water Risk Filter, Water Risk Monetizer, or other comparable tool or methodology to determine the water stressed areas in your portfolio?

Yes

N/A

Safety

Employee OSHA Recordable Cases

2

N/A

Annual Employee Workhours

1,348,781

N/A

Employee TRIR
(Employee OSHA Recordable Cases x 200,000 / Annual Employee Workhours)

0.30

N/A

Contractor OSHA Recordable Cases

18

N/A

Annual Contractor Workhours

5,063,315

N/A

Contractor TRIR
(Contractor OSHA Recordable Cases x 200,000 / Annual Contractor Workhours)

0.71

N/A

Combined Employee and Contractor OSHA Recordable Cases

20

N/A

Annual Combined Employee and Contractor Workhours

6,412,096

N/A

Employee and Contractor Combined TRIR
(Combined Employee and Contractor OSHA Recordable Cases x 200,000 / Annual Combined Employee and Contractor Workhours)

0.62

N/A

All data is for the year-ended December 31, 2021. In the third quarter of 2021, we acquired strategic assets located in the Appalachian Basin (the Alta Assets) from Alta Resources Development, LLC (the Alta Acquisition). The Alta Acquisition closed on July 21, 2021, and had an effective date of January 1, 2021. The data included in the table under the “EQT” column generally includes data from the Alta Assets, except production, emissions, flaring and spill data, which is disclosed separately under the “Alta Assets” column.

Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) Index

Governance
Disclose the organization’s governance around climate-related risks and opportunities.

a) Describe the board’s oversight of climate-related risks and opportunities.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Governance; CDP, C1

b) Describe management’s role in assessing and managing climate-related risks and opportunities.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Governance;

Strategy
Disclose the actual and potential impacts of climate-related risks and opportunities on the organization’s businesses, strategy and financial planning.

a) Describe the climate-related risks and opportunities the organization has identified over the short, medium and long term.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Accelerating the Low Carbon Transition;
Vision for EQT in the Energy Transition;
2021 Form 10-K, pgs. 24-27, 36-37

b) Describe the impact of climate-related risks and opportunities on the organization’s businesses, strategy and financial planning.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Accelerating the Low Carbon Transition;
Vision for EQT in the Energy Transition

c) Describe the potential impact of different scenarios, including a 2°C scenario, on the organization’s businesses, strategy and financial planning.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Vision for EQT in the Energy Transition

Risk Management
Disclose how the organization identifies, assesses, and manages climate-related risks.

a) Describe the organization’s processes for identifying and assessing climate-related risks.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Risk Management

b) Describe the organization’s processes for managing climate- related risks.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Risk Management

c) Describe how processes for identifying, assessing and managing climate-related risks are integrated into the organization’s overall risk management.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — Risk Management

Metrics and Targets
Disclose the metrics and targets used to assess and manage relevant climate-related risks and opportunities.

a) Disclose the metrics used by the organization to assess climate-related risks and opportunities in line with its strategy and risk management process.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — GHG Emissions and Targets

b) Disclose Scope 1, Scope 2 and, if appropriate, Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the related risks.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — GHG Emissions and Targets

We are exploring new ventures and researching alternative technologies to address our Scope 3 emissions.

c) Describe the targets used by the organization to manage climate-related risks and opportunities and performance against targets.

Climate Change and GHG Emissions — GHG Emissions and Targets

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