environmental
Air Quality

Why It Matters to Us

103-1
Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

103-1

Air emissions associated with our fleet, on-site equipment and other aspects of our operations can affect local air quality. We carefully track and monitor our local air emissions and sources to capitalize on innovative opportunities to improve our systems and processes. We work with regulators, communities and other stakeholders to lessen our impact and reduce local air emissions. Our strong record of environmental compliance and positive reputation may facilitate future permitting processes.

For information related to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, see Climate and GHG Emissions.

What We Are Doing

103-2
The management approach and its components

103-2

We monitor operational air emissions in compliance with relevant state and federal regulations. We use this data to inform the continuous improvement of our processes and procedures. Individual permits tend to require activity and emission data tracking, and, in some cases, our historical data inventories date back to 1991. Across our operations, we continue to implement new and improved technologies that lead to more efficient processes and reduce local air emissions.

Governance

Our Environmental department, led by our Director, Environmental Affairs, is responsible for the oversight and management of all aspects of our environmental footprint. This department reports to the Vice President, Environmental, Health and Safety and is ultimately guided by the Public Policy and Corporate Responsibility (PPCR) Committee of the Board of Directors as well as the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) Committee. The Air Quality team, within the Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) department, is responsible for air quality permitting, compliance and reporting. The PPCR Committee receives quarterly reports on environmental progress such as emission reports, notices of violations and obtained permits.

Permits and Monitoring

Prior to construction or operation at a new wellsite location, we may be required to obtain air quality and other operational permits. When we receive a new permit, our Operations group reviews the permit to identify any future compliance responsibilities. We communicate permit requirements to our field workers, who collect and upload data into our Work Management System. We track emissions, obligations, limits and other air quality requirements in the Environmental Management System. We review the Environmental Management System monthly and identify improved processes for tracking and inputting information. We are planning to transition to a new air emissions tracking platform in 2020 that will enable anyone at EQT to view or pull this data from a centralized location.

Electrifying Our Frac Fleet

In alignment with our unyielding focus on decreasing completion costs and improving efficiencies while minimizing environmental impact, we decided to begin electrifying our hydraulic fracturing (frac) fleet in late 2019 by using onsite natural gas to power a portion of our completions operations. Rather than relying on diesel deliveries to a wellsite to power our frac fleets, we will be able to reduce local air emissions, decrease our carbon footprint, reduce trucks on the road and capture proven operational efficiencies. We signed a long-term agreement with U.S. Well Services in April 2020 to provide electric hydraulic fracturing services. We look forward to reporting on increased efficiencies as a result of these actions.

How We Are Doing

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Evaluation of the management approach

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Audits and Reporting

We utilize inspections and audits to review compliance obligations and improve our operations. Our Corporate Audit group periodically selects internal programs or processes to audit. In reviewing findings, lessons learned can be applied to similar facilities via a Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle of continuous improvement.

Where required, we submit emissions reports and, in some cases, permit compliance certifications, to applicable regulatory authorities. The reporting requirements vary by state. We submit reports to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and de minimis thresholds for relevant emissions in some states.

Inspections and Benchmarking

305-7
Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX) and other significant air emissions

SASB EM-EP-120a.1
Air emissions of the following pollutants: (1) NOx (excluding N2O), (2) SOx, (3) volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and (4) particulate matter (PM10)

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SASB EM-EP-120a.1

Our compliance personnel regularly inspect work site locations to evaluate air quality compliance. They also meet with state regulators to ensure we are aligned with state air quality regulations. We participate in a network of industry and regulatory groups to stay abreast of emerging regulations. Our Environmental group also conducts internal inspections on our facilities and sites and field personnel perform periodic leak detection and repair inspections, as described in Climate and GHG Emissions.

We benchmark our air emissions against our peers to identify potential improvement areas and evaluate our primary sources of internal emissions across our operating regions. In areas of success, we consult with state regulators and share best practices.

We aim for 100% facility compliance with all permit requirements and emissions limitations, and we review any operational incidents and notices of violation. We utilize stack test data, manufacturers’ data and published emissions factors to calculate our air emissions.

Significant Air Emissions (kilograms)

Significant Air Emissions (Kilograms)*
Target
10 Million
9 Million
8 Million
7 Million
6 Million
5 Million
4 Million
3 Million
2 Million
1 Million
0

2,719,142

 

1,655,250

 

3,413,603

 

1,378,736

 

283,478

 

210,648

 

4,157

 

1,882

 

513,322

 

3,417,520

 

1,646,913

 

1,593,584

 

36,106

 

333,300

 

117,680

 

115,394

 

91,676

 

53,705

 

112,352

 

44,590

 

1,029,691

 

623,327

 

949,086

 

487,436

 

5,153

 

7,983

 

23,856

 

22,038

 
Nitrogen Oxides (NOx)Sulfur Oxides (SOx)Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP)Particulate Matter (PM)Carbon Monoxide (CO)Formaldehyde
2016
2017
2018[1]
2019

Air Emissions Intensities by Business (tons/BCFE)
 Metric

2016

2017

2018[1]

2019

Nitrogen oxides (NOx)

3.95

2.23

2.53  1.01 

Sulfur oxides (SO2)

0.41

0.28

0.00  0.00 

Volatile organic compounds (VOC)

0.75 

4.61

1.22  1.16 

Hazardous air pollutants (HAP)

0.05

0.45 0.09  0.08 
Particulate matter (PM) 0.13 0.07 0.08  0.03 
Carbon monoxide (CO) 1.50 0.84 0.70  0.36 
Formaldehyde 0.01 0.01 0.02  0.02 
Top 10 Production and Emissions Breakdown by Play in 20182

Top 10 Production and Emissions Breakdown by Play in 2018(2)
Target
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

100

Other (26%)

Barnett (2%)

Utica (4%)

DJ (4%)

SCOOPSTACK (5%)

Haynesville (6%)

Bakken-US (8%)

Midland (9%)

Eagle Ford (11%)

Delaware (11%)

Marcellus (16%)

 

100

Other (32%)

DJ (3%)

Barnett (4%)

SCOOPSTACK (4%)

Marcellus (4%)

San Juan (5%)

Midland (7%)

Eagle Ford (7%)

San Joaquin (7%)

Delaware (11%)

Bakken-US (16%)

 
ProductionEmissions
Other
Barnett
Utica
DJ
SCOOPSTACK
Haynesville
Bakken-US
San Juan
Midland
Eagle Ford
San Joaquin
Delaware
Marcellus

2018 Upstream Emissions Intensity by Anonymized Oil and Gas Producer (kg CO2e/boe)2,3

Air Quality
Global
2
EQT
3
Northeastern U.S.
3
Northeastern U.S.
3
Northeastern U.S.
3
Northeastern U.S.
4
Southwestern U.S.
5
Southwestern U.S.
7
Global
7
Global
8
Global
8
Southwestern U.S.
9
Global
9
Global
10
Southwestern U.S.
10
Global
10
Global
11
Global
13
Southwestern U.S.
13
Global
13
Global
13
Southwestern U.S.
14
Global
14
Southwestern U.S.
14
Global
15
Global
18
Southwestern U.S.
18
Global
19
Southwestern U.S.
27
Global
33
Global
34
Southwestern U.S.
35
Southwestern U.S.
39
Southwestern U.S.
40
Southwestern U.S.
42
Southwestern U.S.
43
Southwestern U.S.
50

1 2018 emissions data have been restated to reflect corrections in our calculations made to 2018 reporting.

2 Source: RS Energy Group, a part of Enverus.

3 We anonymized global oil and gas producers by categorizing companies by their primary operating area. “Southwestern U.S.” refers to companies primarily operating in the following U.S. regions: Western Rockies, Mid-Continent, Permian, Gulf Coast, Alaska and Western United States. “Northeastern U.S.” refers to companies primarily operating in the Eastern United States. “Global” refers to companies operating in multiple countries.

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